Medicare patients: check to make sure you're covered next year. Learn More

SAUS.TJO.17.06.4696q(1)

Printed From:

USING LANTUS®?

LEARN HOW TO INJECT INSULIN

Whether you’re new to insulin injection pens or switching from another one, it’s important to learn how to use the Lantus® SoloStar® pen. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, there’s info for that too.

INSULIN INJECTION SITES: CHOOSE THE BEST SITE FOR YOU

Using Lantus doesn’t have to be difficult, but it does take practice. Your doctor or a member of your healthcare team will show you how.

Where to inject using the Lantus SoloStar pen, or vial and syringe

  • Inject into the less sensitive layer of fatty tissue just under the skin
  • It should not be injected into the muscle
  • Avoid moles or scars
  • THE STOMACH

    Except for a 2-inch circle around the navel

  • THE TOP AND OUTER THIGHS

    Avoid administering too close to the bony area above the knee

  • THE OUTER, UPPER ARMS

    Use the outer back area of the upper arm where there is fatty tissue

Important to remember

  • With Lantus, injection sites may be rotated between these three areas (1, 2, and 3 shown above) because the rate of absorption for Lantus is similar for all three
  • Each time you inject Lantus, use a different site within those three areas. Also rotate your injection sites as instructed by your healthcare provider
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles

GETTING THE DOSAGE THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU

Whether you’re new to using insulin or already on insulin, expect your dose to be adjusted by your doctor over time. This is called titration. You may need to adjust your dose every 3 to 4 days until you reach the amount that’s right for you.

YOUR DOCTOR WILL BASE YOUR DOSE ON:

  • Your blood sugar testing results
  • Your blood sugar goal number
  • Your needs

FOR HELP ALONG THE WAY, TRY MY DOSE COACH

This app may help you adjust to any doctor-directed changes to your once-daily, long-acting insulin dose. It’s free. And My Dose Coach works with Android and Apple devices.

GET MY DOSE COACH

HOW TO USE THE LANTUS SOLOSTAR INSULIN PEN

Now that you and your doctor have decided Lantus is right for you, watch this step-by-step video to learn how to use the Lantus SoloStar pen.

Watch and learn with our step-by-step video. But always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

SUPER: Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Laura: Hi, my name is Laura. I’d like to take a few minutes to tell you what you need to know about starting Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL using the SoloSTAR® pen. You’ve taken an important step by adding Lantus® to your diabetes treatment plan. One dose of Lantus® at the same time each day works all day and all night. Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

SUPER: Important Safety Information. Do not take Lantus®:

  • during episodes of low blood sugar
  • if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Important Safety Information. Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

SUPER: The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen delivers the dose you dial time after time.

Laura: The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen delivers the dose you dial time after time. Today, I’ll be demonstrating the correct way to use the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen.

SUPER: The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen features:

  • small, thin needles
  • a large print dosing window
  • dial-in dose
  • push-button injection.

Laura: The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen can fit into your daily routine. It features small, thin needles, a large print dosing window, dial-in dose, and push-button injection.

SUPER: Do NOT:

  • share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others
  • reuse needles

Laura: Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do not reuse needles.

To demonstrate how to correctly use the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen, I’ll be taking you through these 6 steps:

  • Checking the insulin
  • Attaching the needle
  • Performing a safety test
  • Selecting the dose
  • Injecting the dose
  • Removing and discarding the needle

Super: WHAT WE’LL COVER:

Step One: Inject the insulin

Step Two: Attach the Needle

Step Three: Perform a Safety Test

Step Four: Select the Dose

Step Five: Inject the Dose

Step Six: Remove and Discard Needle

It is important that you go over these instructions carefully before you using your SoloStar® pen.

Step one: check the insulin.

SUPER: An unopened SoloSTAR® Pen should be refrigerated until first use. Do not store an opened SoloSTAR® pen in a refrigerator.

Laura: If your SoloSTAR® pen is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you inject to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin may be painful to inject.

SUPER: Check the label on your SoloSTAR® pen.

Laura: First, check the label on your SoloSTAR® pen to make sure you have the correct pen and insulin. The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen is gray with a purple injection button.

Check the expiration date on the label of your pen. Do not use a SoloSTAR® pen after the expiration date.

SUPER: Do not use the pen if the insulin is cloudy, colored, or has particles.

Laura: Take off the pen cap. Check the appearance of the insulin. Lantus® is a clear insulin. Do not use the pen if the insulin is cloudy, colored, or has particles.

Step two: attach the needle.

Laura: Do not reuse needles. Always use a new sterile needle for each injection. This helps prevent contamination and potential needle blocks.

SUPER: Wipe the rubber seal.

Laura: Wipe the rubber seal with alcohol.

SUPER: Remove the protective seal.

Laura: Remove the protective seal from a new needle.

SUPER: Keep the needle straight as you attach it.

Laura: Line up the needle with the pen, and keep it straight as you attach it. Depending on the needle type, it may be pushed on or screwed on. If the needle is not kept straight while you attach it, it can damage the rubber seal and cause leakage, or break the needle.

Step three: perform a safety test.

SUPER: Do NOT use a syringe to remove Lantus® from your SoloSTAR® pen.

Laura: Always perform the safety test before each injection.

Performing the safety test ensures you get an accurate dose. It ensures that the pen and needle work properly, and it also removes air bubbles in the insulin.

SUPER: Select a dose of 2 units

Laura: Select a dose of 2 units by turning the dosage selector.

SUPER: Take off the outer needle cap.

Laura: Take off the outer needle cap and keep it to remove the used needle after injection.

Take off the inner needle cap and discard it.

Hold the pen with the needle pointing upwards. Then tap the insulin reservoir so that any air bubbles rise up towards the needle.

SUPER: Check if insulin comes out of the needle tip.

Laura: Press the button all the way in. Check if insulin comes out of the needle tip. You may have to perform the safety test several times before insulin is seen. If no insulin comes out, check for air bubbles and repeat the safety test two more times to remove them.

SUPER: If insulin still does not come out, the needle may be blocked. Change the needle and try again. If no insulin comes out after changing the needle, your SoloSTAR® pen may be damaged. Do not use it. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Lantus® from your SoloSTAR® pen.

Laura: If insulin still does not come out, the needle may be blocked. Change the needle and try again. If no insulin comes out after changing the needle, your SoloSTAR® pen may be damaged. Do not use it.

Step four: select the dose.

Laura: You can set the dose in steps of 1 unit, from a minimum of 1 unit to a maximum of 80 units. If you need a dose greater than 80 units, you should give it as two or more doses.

Check that the dose window shows “0” following the safety test.

SUPER: Select your required dose. Ask for help if you have problems handling the pen, for example, if you have problems with your eyesight.

Laura: Select your required dose. If you turn past your dose, you can turn the dial back down. Do not push the injection button while turning, as insulin will come out.

You cannot turn the dosage selector past the number of units left in the pen. Do not force the dosage selector to turn. If what remains is less than you need, either you can inject what is remaining in the pen and complete your dose with a new SoloSTAR® pen, or you can use a new SoloSTAR® pen for your full dose.

Step five: inject the dose.

Laura: Use the injection method as instructed by your healthcare professional.

SUPER: The injection site should be changed each time you inject within the area you selected. DO NOT use the exact spot for each injection.

Laura: You can inject Lantus® in three areas of your body

Anywhere in your stomach area, except for a two-inch radius around your navel.

In the fatty tissue on the outer back area of your upper arm.

Or in your thighs. Remember, the injection site should be changed each time you inject.

Clean the injection site with an alcohol swab. Then insert the needle into the skin.

SUPER: Deliver the dose by pressing the injection button in all the way.

Laura: Deliver the dose by pressing the injection button in all the way. The number in the dose window will return to “0” as you inject.

SUPER: Keep the button pressed, and slowly count to 10.

Laura: Keep the button pressed all the way in. Slowly count to 10 before you withdraw the needle from the skin. This ensures that the full dose will be delivered.

Step six: remove and discard the needle.

Laura: Always remove the needle after each dose and store your SoloSTAR® pen without a needle attached. This helps prevent contamination and/or infection, as well as entry of air into the insulin reservoir and leakage of insulin, which can cause inaccurate dosing.

SUPER: Put the outer needle cap back on the needle, and use it to unscrew the needle from the pen.

Laura: Put the outer needle cap back on the needle, and use it to unscrew the needle from the pen. To reduce the risk of accidental needle injury, never replace the inner needle cap. If your injection is given by another person, special caution should be taken by this person when removing and disposing of the needle. Be sure to follow recommended safety measures for removal and disposal of needles in order to reduce the risk of accidental needle injury and transmission of infectious diseases.

Now I’m going to show you how to safely dispose of the needle.

SUPER: Used needles should be placed in Sharps containers.

Laura: Used needles should be placed in sharps containers (such as red biohazard containers), hard plastic containers (such as detergent bottles), or metal containers (such as an empty coffee can). Such containers should be sealed and disposed of properly. If you are giving an injection to a third person, you should remove the needle in an approved manner to avoid needle-stick injuries.

SUPER: Always put the pen cap back on the pen before storing the pen.

Laura: Always put the pen cap back on the pen before storing the pen until your next injection.

Storing your pen.

Laura: Please review the leaflet that came with your Lantus® prescription for complete instructions on how to use and store the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen. If your SoloSTAR® pen is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you use it to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin may be painful to inject. Keep the SoloSTAR® pen out of the reach and sight of children.

Keep your unopened SoloSTAR® pen in cool storage until first use. Cool storage is between 36 and 46 degrees Fahrenheit, or 2 and 8 degrees Celsius. Do not allow it to freeze. Do not put it next to the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, or next to a freezer pack.

Once you take your SoloSTAR® pen out of cool storage, for use or as a spare, you can use it for up to 28 days. During this time it can be safely kept at room temperature, up to 86 degrees Fahrenheit or 30 degrees Celsius. Do not use it after this time.

Do not use a SoloSTAR® pen after the expiration date printed on the label of the pen or the label on the carton. Protect your SoloSTAR® pen from light. Discard your used SoloSTAR® pen as required by your local authorities

Caring for your SoloSTAR® pen.

Laura: Protect your SoloSTAR® pen from dust and dirt. You can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® pen by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not soak, wash, or lubricate the pen as this may damage it. Your SoloSTAR® pen is designed to work accurately and safely. It should be handled with care. Avoid situations where the SoloSTAR® pen might be damaged. If you are concerned that your SoloSTAR® pen may be damaged, use a new one. If you have any further questions about the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen or managing your diabetes, be sure to speak to your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Thanks for joining me on this walk through how to use the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen. I hope that you found these instructions helpful. Now, I will present the full Important Safety Information for Lantus®.

What is Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL?

Laura: Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others reuse needles.

Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements.

Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection.

While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Lantus® affects you. You should not drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Lantus® may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get medical help right away if you have

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Trouble breathing
  • A fast heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion

Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, low potassium levels, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Please see full Prescribing Information at the link on this website.

SAUS.GLA.17.09.7575a

HOW TO INJECT LANTUS WITH A VIAL AND SYRINGE

If your doctor told you to take Lantus using a vial and syringe, this presentation can help walk you through it, step by step.

BEFORE YOU GET STARTED

  • Wash your hands
  • Make sure the insulin is clear and colorless. Do not use it if it is cloudy or if you see particles; throw it away
  • Do not mix or dilute Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended, and you may lose blood sugar control
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Always use a new syringe

START

For instructions on how to inject Lantus, please talk to your treating healthcare provider and refer to the instruction leaflet that came with your vial.

Download the Lantus Vial and Syringe Injection Guide

BE SYRINGE SAVVY

To make sure you get the right dose of insulin, always use a U-100 insulin syringe. (Your pharmacist can help you make sure you have the right syringe.) If you have trouble seeing the volume lines on a syringe, ask your healthcare team or pharmacist for a magnifying device that can help.

STORAGE INSTRUCTIONS

  • Store unused Lantus vials in the refrigerator between 36˚F to 46˚F (2˚C to 8˚C)
  • Store in-use (opened) Lantus vials in a refrigerator or at room temperature below 86˚F (30˚C)
  • Do not freeze Lantus
  • Keep Lantus out of direct heat and light
  • If a vial has been frozen or overheated, throw it away
  • The Lantus vials you are using should be thrown away after 28 days, even if it still has insulin left in it

SIDE EFFECTS

COMMON AND SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS: WHAT TO WATCH FOR

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Ask your doctor about the symptoms and signs of hypoglycemia, how to track your blood sugar, and what to do if you suffer a hypoglycemic event.

OTHER POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS

Lantus may cause serious side effects.

Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Trouble breathing
  • A fast heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Swelling of your face, throat, or tongue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Extreme drowsiness, confusion, or dizziness
These are not all the possible side effects of Lantus. Speak with your doctor about possible side effects. For more detailed information, see the Important Safety Information for Lantus and Full Prescribing Information.

GOT QUESTIONS? SEE OUR FAQS

If you’re like lots of folks, you may have questions. We’ll give you the answers to some of the most common questions asked about diabetes—and Lantus.

Lantus is an injection administered under the skin. This is called a “subcutaneous” injection. There are two ways you can inject Lantus: with the Lantus SoloStar® pen, or with a vial and syringe.

Get more facts

Weight gain can occur with any insulin therapy, including Lantus. Following a healthy diet and exercise program can help with weight control. Try some of our healthy recipes to help you stay on track.

See Tools + Tips

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart and brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Lantus may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Trouble breathing
  • A fast heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
More about side effects

No. Do not mix Lantus with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended, and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious.

More about how to use Lantus

Your doctor will guide you on any adjustments that need to be made. So, if you’re also taking mealtime insulin, you should talk to your doctor about any changes you may need to make to your mealtime insulin dose. You may be able to get even more help with the app, My Dose Coach

No. Only Lantus is Lantus. Proven to lower A1C and help control blood sugar for a full 24 hours, it’s the choice of physicians and millions of patients worldwide. While there are now similar medicines available, Lantus is the most prescribed1 long-acting insulin. It’s available at a $0* copay, whether or not you have private or commercial insurance. If you have Medicare Part D insurance, it’s good to know that 8 out of 10 patients receive prescription coverage of Lantus at the lowest branded copay.

Sign up for savings now

1Based on TRx data from IMS Health, NPATM monthly database, time period from May 2003 to January 2018.

*Subject to eligibility. Restrictions apply.

Lantus and Toujeo are both once-daily, long-acting insulins. Use the chart to see how they compare.

Compared to a unit of any other long-acting insulin

††Toujeo: 42 days Lantus 28 days

Please see Full Indication, Limitations of Use and Important Safety Information for Toujeo (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL

Please see Full Prescribing Information

Interested?

Talk with your doctor about how Toujeo compares with Lantus, or visit toujeo.com

LEARN MORE
  • You can apply for a $0* copay—whether Lantus is covered by your commercial insurance or not.
  • If you are on Medicare Part D—8 out of 10 patients on Medicare Part D receive prescription coverage of Lantus at the lowest branded copay.
  • What if I don’t have insurance? Can I still save on Lantus? Yes, Sanofi is committed to providing savings for people who pay full retail price for Lantus. If you qualify, you’ll pay $99* for a 10ml vial or $149* for a pack of 5 pens.
Sign Up Now

*Subject to eligibility. Restrictions apply.

Lantus is the most prescribed long-acting insulin. Developed by the makers of Lantus, SOLIQUA 100/33 combines Lantus with lixisenatide, a non-insulin diabetes medicine, to work together to help lower A1C. It was developed for adult patients with type 2 diabetes who have been unable to lower their A1C with diet, exercise, and long-acting insulin (< 60 units daily).

SOLIQUA 100/33 does more than insulin alone; it works 5 ways in your body to help deliver blood sugar control and lower A1C.

Is SOLIQUA 100/33 right for you? Find out more at soliqua100-33.com

Based on TRx data from IMS Health, NPATM monthly database, time period from May 2003 to January 2018.

Please see Full Indication, Limitations of Use and Important Safety Information for SOLIQUA 100/33

Please see Full Prescribing Information

Yes, Sanofi is committed to providing savings for people who pay full retail price for Lantus. If you qualify, you’ll pay $99* for a 10ml vial or $149* for a pack of 5 pens.

*Subject to eligibility. Restrictions apply.

What is Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL?

Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL)
  • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Toujeo® should not be used in children

Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®.

Do NOT share your pen(s) with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed.

Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms, including:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden weight gain
  • Swelling of your ankles or feet

Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbal supplements.

Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using any insulin. Do not change your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verify that you have the correct insulin before each injection. Do NOT use a syringe to remove Toujeo® from your pen. Your dose for Toujeo® may be different from other insulins you have taken. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Toujeo® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Use Toujeo® only if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible.

While using Toujeo®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Toujeo® affects you. Don’t drink alcohol or use other medicines that contain alcohol.

The most common side effect of any insulin, including Toujeo®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may cause harm to your heart or brain. Symptoms of serious low blood sugar may include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision.

Toujeo® may cause severe allergic reactions that can lead to death. Get medical help right away if you have:

  • A rash over your whole body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of your face, tongue, or throat
  • Extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Sweating

Toujeo® may have additional side effects including swelling, weight gain, low potassium, and injection site reactions, which may include change in fat tissue, skin thickening, redness, swelling, and itching.

Toujeo® SoloStar® and Toujeo® Max SoloStar® are disposable prefilled insulin pens. It is important to perform a safety test when using a new pen for the first time. Talk to your doctor about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that comes with the pen.

SOLIQUA 100/33 is an injectable prescription medicine that contains 2 diabetes medicines, insulin glargine and lixisenatide, that may improve blood sugar (glucose) control in adults with type 2 diabetes, when used with diet and exercise in people who are not controlled with long-acting (basal) insulin (less than 60 units daily) or lixisenatide.

  • It has not been studied in people with a history of pancreatitis.
  • It is not recommended for people who also take lixisenatide or other medicines called GLP-1 receptor agonists.
  • It is not for use in people with type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, or who have a stomach problem that causes slow emptying (gastroparesis).
  • It has not been studied together with short-acting insulin.
  • It is not known if SOLIQUA 100/33 is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age.

Important Safety Information for SOLIQUA® 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) 100 Units/mL and 33 mcg/mL

What is the most important information I should know about SOLIQUA 100/33?

Do not share your SOLIQUA 100/33 pen with other people, even if the needle has been changed.

SOLIQUA 100/33 can cause serious side effects, including inflammation of the pancreas, which may be life-threatening.

Before using SOLIQUA 100/33, tell your doctor if you have had pancreatitis, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. These medical problems may make you more likely to get pancreatitis. Stop taking SOLIQUA 100/33 and call your healthcare provider right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe, and will not go away. The pain may be felt in the back area. The pain may happen with or without vomiting.

Who should not use SOLIQUA 100/33?

Do not use SOLIQUA 100/33 if you are having an episode of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine, lixisenatide, or any of the ingredients in SOLIQUA 100/33.

Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have or have had problems with your pancreas, your kidneys, or your liver, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism.
  • have heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs (thiazolidinediones).
  • have severe problems with your stomach, such as slowed emptying of your stomach or problems digesting food.
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIQUA 100/33 will harm your unborn baby or pass into your breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. SOLIQUA 100/33 may affect the way some medicines work. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33, talk to your healthcare provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it.

How should I use SOLIQUA 100/33?

  • Do not change your dose without first talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Check the pen label each time you inject to make sure you are using the correct medicine.
  • Do not take more than 60 units of SOLIQUA 100/33 each day. Do not take SOLIQUA 100/33 with other GLP-1 receptor agonists.
  • Only use SOLIQUA 100/33 that is clear and colorless to almost colorless. If you see small particles, return it to your pharmacy for replacement.
  • Do not remove SOLIQUA 100/33 from the pen with a syringe.
  • Do not re-use or share needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your healthcare provider what your blood sugar should be and when you should check.

SOLIQUA 100/33 may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Serious allergic reactions. Stop taking SOLIQUA 100/33 and get help right away if you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, problems breathing or swallowing, severe rash or itching, fainting or feeling dizzy, and very rapid heartbeat.
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Your risk for getting low blood sugar is higher if you take another medicine that can cause low blood sugar. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, weakness, irritability, hunger, sweating, fast heartbeat, and feeling jittery.
  • Kidney problems (kidney failure). In people who have kidney problems, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting may cause a loss of fluids (dehydration), which may worsen kidney problems.
  • Low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia).
  • Heart failure. Taking certain diabetes pills called TZDs (thiazolidinediones) with SOLIQUA 100/33 may cause heart failure in some people. This can happen even if you have never had heart failure or heart problems before. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with SOLIQUA 100/33. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new or worse symptoms of heart failure, including shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, sudden weight gain.

The most common side effects of SOLIQUA 100/33 may include low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, upper respiratory tract infection, headache, allergic reactions, nausea, and diarrhea. Nausea and diarrhea usually happen more often when you start using SOLIQUA 100/33.