Prescription Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

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Week 2: Healthy Eating: It's More Than Just Carbs…

Having diabetes doesn't mean you have to avoid your favorite foods. You simply have to eat less of certain foods and more of others. It's all about moderation and making healthy choices. Knowing the carbohydrates (carbs) and calories in the foods you eat is one way to make sure you're eating healthy.

One carb serving is equal to 15 grams of carbohydrates.

Most men can set a goal of 4 to 5 carb servings per meal, and most women can aim for 3 to 4 carb servings per meal, but ask your healthcare team what your goal should be. Choose foods rich in vitamins, minerals, and fiber instead of processed foods, and include foods you have a passion for, so you don't feel like you're depriving yourself and can enjoy food that's good for you.

While the focus is on choosing between carb and calorie foods here, remember that it's important to have a well-balanced diet. For help making more informed meal planning decisions, please click here to get started.

Which of these foods would you choose?

Let's start with the most important meal of the day: breakfast.

Which is the lower carb/ lower calorie choice?

One cup of Bran Flakes with 1 cup of skim milk
vs
One Poached Egg with one slice of whole wheat bread

Egg with Bread

As healthy as bran flakes and skim or low-fat milk may be, this breakfast option has over 1¼ times more calories than the egg with whole wheat bread, as well as 2½ times as many carbs. Both have a similar amount of protein.

For low-calorie beverages, coffee and tea are good choices with 0 calories and 0 carbs. But today you want something else. Which has fewer carbs and calories?

One cup of Low Fat Milk
vs
One cup of Orange Juice

Low-fat Milk

Low-fat milk has more protein, fewer calories, and fewer carbs than orange juice.

At a Chinese restaurant, you ordered steamed chicken and broccoli as your main course. Good for you!

Which of these side dishes is lower in carbs?

One vegetable Egg Roll
vs
One cup of Fried Rice

Egg Roll

While both the egg roll and fried rice are rich in calories, a cup of fried rice has almost twice as many carbohydrates.

You scooped out two tablespoons of peanut butter to make a sandwich.

Which has fewer carbs and calories?

English Muffin
vs
Plain Bagel

English Muffin

An English muffin has 120 calories vs. 289 for the bagel. It also has less than half as many carbs.

Which of these dairy products has the lower carb count?

One cup of low-fat Cottage Cheese
vs
One cup of low-fat Yogurt

Cottage Cheese

A cup of plain yogurt has twice as many carbs (16 g) as a cup of cottage cheese (8 g). A fruit-flavored yogurt (43 g) has more than 5 times the carb count of the cottage cheese!

Skinless chicken and salmon filets are both healthy dinner choices, but

which would you choose?

Broiled Chicken
vs
Baked Salmon

Both are good options!

That was a trick question; both choices have 0 carbs, and both are great choices. The chicken, however, has about 70% fewer calories than the salmon. On the other hand, the salmon has all those good omega-3 fatty acids.

Which vegetable would you choose

to add to your chicken or salmon dinner to keep the carbs and calories lower?

One cup of Broccoli
vs
One cup of Peas

Broccoli

Choosing the broccoli (6 g) instead of the peas (24 g) saves both carbs and calories. A cup of cooked broccoli has 1/3 the calories of a cup of cooked peas.

Dessert doesn't always have to be a piece of fruit.

Which of these options has about 1 carb serving?

½ cup of Vanilla Ice Cream
vs
½ cup of Chocolate Pudding

1/2 cup Vanilla Ice Cream

The reduced fat ice cream has almost half the carbs of pudding (15 g vs 28 g).

Here's a bonus question about condiments.

Which of these choices will add the fewest carbs and calories to your hamburger?

Ketchup
vs
Barbeque Sauce

Ketchup

Stick with the ketchup. It not only has 60% less calories but it has just ¼ the amount of carbs.

Congratulations! You've Completed the challenge. Making informed choices takes practice but once you get the hang of it you'll enjoy the rewards.

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Important Safety Information for
Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.
Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.
Blood Sugar Control. Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Blood Sugar Control.

Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Find out more