Prescription Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

SEND

Day 2: Balancing Insulin With Other Diabetes Medications and Lifestyle Changes to Improve Blood Sugar Control

Now that you've added insulin to your diabetes treatment plan, which may also include diet, exercise, and other diabetes medicines, it may seem a bit overwhelming. But relax, take a deep breath and realize that the trick is to make all these important "to do's"—your meal planning, exercise, other diabetes medications, and insulin—become a part of your daily routine.

That's how this Day by Day Guide can help. It gradually introduces you to one change at a time and gives you some practical tips to help you get through the day.

Of course, everyone's treatment program is different. What's balanced for someone else doesn't mean it's balanced for you. Blood sugar levels always vary from person to person—and in each person from time to time. Speak to your doctor about what ranges are right for you. Working with your doctor to make small changes to your insulin and lifestyle balance can help you work towards your goals.

Your Lifestyle and Lantus®

Click on each topic below to see how balancing lifestyle changes along with your diabetes medication can help you control your blood sugar levels.

Plan Your Meals

Plan Your Meals

Eating healthy meals is one way to help control blood sugar. Our free meal planning guide can help you get started. Talk to your healthcare team before beginning any new meal plan.

Use the Plate Method

Use the Plate Method

Some people find it helpful to create their meals using the Plate Method. To follow this method, divide your plate into sections filling 1/2 with nonstarchy vegetables (such as spinach or broccoli), 1/4 with lean, low-fat protein (meat, fish, or eggs), and 1/4 with carbohydrates (breads or grains). Then add an 8 oz. glass of milk or other small carb serving (light yogurt, for example), and a piece of fruit or salad. This method ensures you are eating a well-balanced meal.

It's a good idea to get support from a registered dietitian who's experienced in diabetes care.

Watch Your Carb Intake

Watch Your Carb Intake

Since carbohydrates (or carbs) are the body's main source of glucose (sugar), it's important to control the amount of carbs you eat. Foods high in carbs are:

  • Potatoes
  • Pastas
  • Breads and other
    grain-based foods
  • Sugary snacks
  • Dairy products
Take Your Lantus® Insulin

Take Your Lantus® Insulin

If you're like many people with diabetes, diet, exercise, and other diabetes medicines may not be enough to help you stay in your blood sugar target range. By adding insulin, you're replacing what your body isn't making enough of. Insulin is the most effective way to control blood sugar levels, along with other diabetes medications, healthy eating, and exercise.

Be Physically Active

Be Physically Active

Adding regular physical activity to your meal plan and medicines can help control blood sugar levels. It also increases energy levels and improves heart health. Let your doctor know before you start, stop, or increase your physical activity levels.

Make Exercise a Part of Your Day

Make Exercise a Part of Your Day

  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator
  • When possible, ride your bicycle instead of driving
  • Go bowling, take a hike, or take a long walk
  • Find a physical activity you enjoy and fit it into your day
  • Check with your doctor before adjusting your activity level
Track Your Blood Sugar Levels

Track Your Blood Sugar Levels

Monitoring of your blood sugar levels helps you and your healthcare team to find the right balance of diet, physical activity, and medicine to meet your A1C goals. Ask your doctor or healthcare professional when and how often to monitor your blood sugar.

Visit Your Healthcare Team

Visit Your Healthcare Team

You play an important role in your diabetes care. Always keep scheduled appointments, and keep your healthcare team informed of changes in your routine that may affect your blood sugar.

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Important Safety Information for
Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.
Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.
Blood Sugar Control. Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Blood Sugar Control.

Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Find out more