Prescription Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

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Day 7: When Life Happens

You've established a daily pattern for yourself that'll help you remember to take your medicine. And you find that, here on Day 7, your diabetes treatment plan has become a part of your routine. That's great news.

But what happens when life suddenly interrupts your day-by-day routine? Say you've been invited to dinner with friends. Or you need to take a flight to go to a family member's wedding. Or you come down with the flu. Now what?

Dining Out Dining Out

Dining Out

Enjoy a dinner with friends with these helpful tips.

Read More
Traveling Traveling

Traveling

Things to know when you're on the road.

Read More
When You Get Sick When You Get Sick

When You Get Sick

Make a difficult time a little less stressful with these guidelines

Read More

When You're Dining Out

Sometimes, a change in your schedule is something that you're looking forward to—like dining out. Fortunately, you can still enjoy restaurants if you stick with the nutritional guidelines your doctor or dietitian discussed with you.

Here are a few simple rules to follow when dining out:

  • Choose a restaurant with a variety of choices. You may be able to see their menu online
  • Call the restaurant and ask if they can prepare a special meal for you
  • Eat the same portion that you would at home. Take any leftovers home with you
  • Order a healthy (not fried, not breaded) appetizer or two instead of an entrée, along with a salad. And try saying "no thanks" when the waiter brings the bread basket to the table
  • Share plates with your dining partners
  • Ask for sauces, gravies, and salad dressings on the side
  • Order fish or meat that's grilled or broiled, without butter
  • Substitute an extra vegetable for french fries

When You're on the Road

Diabetes doesn't have to keep you grounded. You can follow your passion as long as you bring the right supplies and plan ahead.

Here are some things to think about before you take insulin with you on your next vacation.

Getting Ready

  • If you're traveling to a different time zone, talk to your doctor about when you should take your insulin shots
  • Get written prescriptions for your insulin and diabetes pills as well as other medicines in case you need to get more while you're away
  • If you're traveling to another country, get a list of International Diabetes Federation groups at www.idf.org. They should be able to help you fill a prescription and find a doctor in case of an emergency
  • Be sure to wear a medical ID bracelet or carry a wallet card that says you have diabetes
  • Be sure that your medicines are labeled so they are identifiable
  • Pack at least twice as much medicine and blood-testing supplies as you think you'll need. Pack at least half in your carry-on bag and keep it with you

In the Airport and on the Plane

  • Before going through security at the airport, tell the screener that you have diabetes and you're carrying supplies with you
  • The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) recommends (but does not require) that you bring supporting documentation for your medication needs. For details, visit www.tsa.gov
  • When you make your reservation, you can ask for a special meal that's low in sugar, fat, and cholesterol
  • Keep snacks handy in your carry-on bag in case the food tray doesn't come

Once You Arrive

  • Check your blood sugar level as soon as you land because jet lag can make it hard to tell if your level is above or below target ranges
  • If they're already opened, Lantus® SoloSTAR® pens or Lantus® vials don't have to be refrigerated while you're away (for up to 28 days) as long as they aren't stored in a place that's very hot or very cold
  • Be alert to changes in the appearance of your insulin or changes in your insulin needs. If needed, contact your doctor for advice about this

When You're Under the Weather

If you're trying to control your blood sugar levels, getting sick brings an extra little burden. That's because your body is releasing hormones that not only fight infection but also raise blood sugar levels.

Discuss a plan of action with your doctor before you get sick that includes:

  • If you should adjust your insulin dose while you are sick
  • How often you should check your blood sugar levels
  • How to reach your doctor if you need help at off-hours

What to Eat or Drink When You're Sick

You should consume foods that have 15 grams of carbohydrates, which is equal to one carbohydrate serving.

Food Item
Amount
Fruit juice ½ cup
Soda (regular, not diet) ½ cup
Gelatin (regular, not sugar-free) ½ cup
Frozen ice pops (regular, not sugar-free) ½ twin
Saltine crackers 6 squares
Bread 1 slice
Soup 1 cup
Apple sauce ½ cup
Macaroni, noodles, rice ⅓ cup (cooked)

Source: Centers for Disease Control

Keep a Record

Keep track of how you're doing by keeping a record in your blood sugar log.

Don't take any nonprescription medicines without talking with your doctor. Many nonprescription medicines affect your blood sugar level.

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Important Safety Information for
Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.
Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.
Blood Sugar Control. Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Blood Sugar Control.

Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Find out more