Prescription Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.

Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

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Day 1: Start Taking Control by Asking a Few Questions

Here are some questions that we've heard people ask after their first day of taking Lantus®. To make it easier to find a question you'd like answered, we've grouped them into three subject areas.

Lantus® Insulin Lantus® Insulin

Lantus® Insulin

Learn more about Lantus® insulin, including how it works and how to organize your supplies

Read More
Injecting Lantus® Injecting Lantus®

Injecting Lantus®

Here you'll find some helpful information about how and where to inject your Lantus® insulin

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Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen

Lantus®
SoloSTAR® Pen

Find out more about the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen, including how to use it and how to take care of it

Read More

Lantus® Insulin

Can I take Lantus® with diabetes pills?

Lantus® is often taken along with other diabetes medicines. It's important to tell your doctor about all medicines and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works.

Will it take long to get to the right dose of Lantus®?

Your doctor may change your Lantus® dose several times over the first few months. But stick with it—changing your dose to find what works best for you is important. Even after you find the right dose, your doctor may adjust it from time to time.

How often do I take Lantus®?

Once a day, at the same time each day. Most people take Lantus® at bedtime, but you can take it at other times if your healthcare professional says it's okay. You must check your blood sugar levels when taking insulin, such as Lantus®.

Can I inject cold insulin?

It's advised that, before you inject, remove it from the refrigerator an hour or two before you use it—cold insulin can be more uncomfortable to inject. Do NOT refrigerate your pen once it is in use. Learn more.

What should I do if I skip a shot of Lantus®?

Your doctor has specific instructions for you regarding when to take Lantus®. Before starting Lantus®, ask your doctor what to do if you forget to take your insulin.

When should I call my doctor?

Aside from your regular visits, there are a few specific times when you should call your doctor. Ask your doctor when you should call. For example, if you think you are having side effects from Lantus®, call your doctor. Contact your doctor immediately if your blood sugar levels remain consistently high, or call if your blood sugar levels remain consistently low.

When you're sick, you may have a more difficult time keeping your blood sugar levels within target range. During times of illness, it is important to monitor your blood sugar levels more frequently.

What is hyperglycemia? What is hypoglycemia?

Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood sugar (glucose).

Hypoglycemia is when your body has an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose). In other words, your body has too much insulin relative to the amount of glucose.

Several factors can contribute to changes in blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, including food, physical activity, illness, or glucose-lowering medicine.

How can I organize my supplies?

At home, one simple way is to keep your active pen, alcohol swabs, needles, and sharps container all together in a basket or bag next to your bed or in the bathroom cabinet. When you're on the go, keep them in your travel bag, computer bag, briefcase, sports bag, or other carry bag. Remember to keep out of reach of children. If you are currently taking Lantus®, you can also get a free carrying case when you sign up for more Lantus® information.

Injecting Lantus®

Sometimes, the spot where I inject gets red, swollen, or itchy. What is that?

This is called an injection-site reaction and should clear up within a few days or weeks. If it doesn't go away, or if these reactions continue, tell your doctor. Make sure you change injection sites from one injection to the next. Click here to learn more about injection sites.

What happens if I don't rotate injection sites?

As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated between the abdomen, thigh, and upper arm from one injection to the next. Using the same spot every time you inject will toughen up the skin over time, which may affect your body's ability to absorb the insulin.

Can I use the same needle more than one time?

No, always attach a new, sterile needle. Using the same needle can block the insulin from injecting correctly, may cause contamination or spread infection.

Do I need to do a safety test?

Yes, you should always perform the safety test before each injection. This removes air bubbles and ensures that the pen and needle are working properly.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen

Is the Lantus® that's in the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen the same as in the Lantus® vial?

Yes. The Lantus® that comes in the vial is the same Lantus® that's prefilled in the SoloSTAR® pen. The only difference is that it comes in the pen.

Do needles come with the pen, and which needles are recommended?

No. Needles are prescribed separately by your doctor. The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen is compatible with BD-brand needles. Be sure to follow the instructions that come with your pen and your needles.

How many doses can I get out of the pen?

The pen comes prefilled with 300 units. How many doses you get from that will depend on what your doctor prescribes for you.

Does using the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen hurt?

The injection discomfort you may feel varies from person to person. The pen uses a small and very thin needle. The insulin is injected into the fatty layers just under your skin, where there are fewer nerve endings than in other places.

Do I need to use a new pen each time I give myself an injection?

No, you do not need to use a new pen each time you give yourself an injection. However, the needle does have to be changed with every dose. Each Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen contains 300 units of insulin. Use the same pen until there is no more insulin left. The pen can be used for 28 days once you open it.

Why do I have to hold the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen in for 10 seconds?

It is important to keep the injection button pressed all the way in and to slowly count to ten before withdrawing the needle from the skin. After a full injection, the number in the dose window will return to zero. These steps ensure that the full dose has been delivered. To help ensure an accurate dose each time, follow all steps in the instructions included with your Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen. You may also want to take a moment to review your injection techniques by watching the video Injecting with the Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen.

Why does insulin sometimes come out after I inject with the pen?

One reason is that you may not be leaving the needle under the skin long enough. After the injection button is pressed, be sure to count to 10 before you withdraw the needle from the skin. You may also want to take a moment to review your injection techniques by watching the video Injecting with the Lantus® SoloSTAR® Pen.

What do I do if there is not enough insulin left in the pen for my injection?

The Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen prevents you from dialing past the number of units left in the pen. If there isn't enough insulin for your full dose, you can complete your dose by calculating how much more you will need from a new pen. For example, if you normally use 41 units and there are only 12 units left in your pen, you will need 29 units from the new pen. Inject the remaining insulin from the first pen, and then inject the appropriate amount with the new pen to complete your dose. Or, you can just use a new pen for your full dose. Always remember to check the dial at each injection to be sure you're getting the correct dose.

How do I take care of the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen?

It's important to protect your pen from dust and dirt, so you can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® pen by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not run it under water or use any soap or solvents.

The pen costs more than the vial. Do I get more doses out of the pen?

It depends on how the prescription is written. With the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen, you can receive up to 500 more units of insulin per prescription for the same co-pay as a vial and syringe under most major insurance plans. Ask your pharmacist or doctor for more information.

Is there any special way that the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen has to be discarded?

Always discard the pen with the pen cap on. You can discard it in the regular trash. But always discard the needles the way your healthcare professional told you to do it. Also visit www.safeneedledisposal.org.

What do I do if my Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen jams?

Representatives will be available for technical support Monday to Friday, 8:00 am CST through 8:00 pm CST, at 1-800-633-1610. In the meantime, use another pen to inject your insulin.

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Important Safety Information for
Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

Tell your doctor about other medicines, especially ones commonly called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have heart failure or other heart problems, liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Click here for Full Prescribing Information for Lantus®.
Click here for information on Sharps Medical Waste Disposal.

The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment.
Blood Sugar Control. Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Blood Sugar Control.

Get the Resources That Can Help You Improve It

Find out more